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Radiolaria phenomenon by Bernotat&Co

Inspired by microscopic organisms

One of our favourits of Milan Design Week was deffintly Radiolaria by Anke Bernotat and Jan Jacob Borstlap owners of Bernatat & Co. Lamps from a white 3D knit (a spacer) with a glow-in-the-dark effect. De design of Radiolaria is based on Mikro/Makrokosmos. a Series of 11 lamps made of 3D-knitted textile with glow-in-the-dark effect, inspired by microscopic organisms and the phenomenon of bioluminescence.

Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014
Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014 Radiolaria

They’re presented in a spatial installation with film. When the light is switched off, the Radiolaria leave a mysterious green afterglow. Each lamp has a different shape, but they’re all equally rotund and strangely scaleless. Are they bacteria? Plancton? Plant seeds? Or maybe planets? Or just from a fairytale, creating a soft and cosy and serene atmosphere in the room.

Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014
Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014 Radiolaria

The Radiolaria are made from woven and knitted 3D spacer fabrics, which are normally hidden inside products and not used for optical purposes. The glow-in-the-dark effect – similar to the effect which everybody knows from kids’ stickers and toys – has been integrated into this technical textile. Thanks to the stiffness of the material and its 3D-structure, the soft lamps have natural volume and don’t require additional reinforcement. The force of gravity influences their final shape, making them charmingly imperfect.

Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014
Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014 Radiolaria

The pattern of each Radiolaria lamp is composed of platonic solids, as geometry lies at the basis of many natural forms. Main source of inspiration was the work of German zoologist and philosopher Ernst Haeckel (1834-1919), who published over 100 detailed illustrations of animals and sea creatures in his book Kunstformen der Natur (‘Art Forms of Nature’) in 1904. The over- riding themes of the Kunstformen plates are symmetry and organization in nature. Among the notable prints are many radiolarians – unicellular organisms that produce intricate mineral skeletons –, which Haeckel helped to popularize among amateur microscopists.

Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014
Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014

Just like Haeckel’s drawings, the Radiolaria combine the aesthetics of mathematics and nature. When the light is switched on, they are transformed into translucent white particles, floating in space. But the real surprise effect comes when the light is switched off again: in the dark, their delicate outlines suddenly light up. The segments of each lamp are sown together with glow- in-the-dark material integrated in the seems, turning them into ephemeral poetic spectres, remotely resembling bioluminescent organisms. This effect makes them perfect for use in e.g. bedrooms, children’s rooms, conference rooms, cinemas or theaters.

Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014
Bernotat&Co in Milan 2014

The Radiolaria collection consists of 11 lamps with diameters ranging from 30 to 80 centimeters. All lamps are provided with porcelain fittings and a silver-coloured cable. Some models have variants: the Tentaculus lamp exists in a small and a big version (Tentaculus minimus and Tentaculus giganticus), and the Discomedusa lamp is either round (Discomedusa infans) or elongated (Discomedusa adulta). Metamorphosus lucidus can be turned inside out, creating a quite a different shape and a totally different glow-in-the-dark effect.

Radiolaria
Radiolaria

Bernotat&Co is a design studio based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, run by Anke Bernotat and Jan Jacob Borstlap. Among their recent projects are the widely published ChairWearcollection, the Cellular Loopchair in cooperation with Folkwang University of the Arts, the Triennial for Gispen and Tangramchocolate bars. essence of Bernotat&Co’s work is to ponder the poetry of normalcy, to tease the rules and discover exceptions, to heighten the contrast between the mundane and surprising. Within these vagaries of perception, the final result becomes an inspiring and practical product.

Photo by Rogier Chang, product photography, Marleen Sleeuwits, staged potography

Via Bernotat&Co


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